General Discussion

Welfare spending - some facts

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Lynne
Lynne
08 Apr 2013 08:20
Brazilnut
Brazilnut
08 Apr 2013 09:58

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2013/04/08/iain-duncan-smith-defends_n_3034952.html?ref=topbar

 

BEWARE THIS MAN IS DANGEROUS!!!!! he is suffering with insenstivity and delusion, should be detained in a mental unit indefinately

1 Agree
Brazilnut
Brazilnut
15 Apr 2013 10:44
Brazilnut
Brazilnut
16 Apr 2013 16:28
Brazilnut
Brazilnut
17 Apr 2013 13:14

see Lynnes letter in the Gazette today, well worth a read

Brazilnut
Brazilnut
24 Apr 2013 09:15

Child Poverty to get worse                                       http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/pay-up-or-watch-child-poverty-get-worse-top-advisers-tell-coalition-8581997.html                                                                                                      

DJ
DJ
24 Apr 2013 10:48

while child poverty is calculated on percentages and average wages you cannot eradicate it because people are lifted in or out of poverty not because their actual personal situation may have changed, but simply because average national wages change

Brazilnut
Brazilnut
28 Apr 2013 09:16

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Lynne
Lynne
28 Apr 2013 16:24

Just been reading about the 1834 Poor Law. Here's an extract.

 

"In 1834 a new Poor Law was introduced. Some people welcomed it because they believed it would:

  • reduce the cost of looking after the poor
  • take beggars off the streets
  • encourage poor people to work hard to support themselves.

Background

Before 1834, the cost of looking after the poor was growing more expensive every year. This cost was paid for by the middle and upper classes in each town through their local taxes. There was a real suspicion amongst the middle and upper classes that they were paying the poor to be lazy and avoid work.

After years of complaint, a new Poor Law was introduced in 1834. The new Poor Law was meant to reduce the cost of looking after the poor, prevent scroungers and impose a system which would be the same all over the country.

Under the new Poor Law, parishes were grouped into unions and each union had to build a workhouse if they did not already have one. Except in special circumstances, poor people could now only get help if they were prepared to leave their homes and go into a workhouse.

Conditions inside the workhouse were deliberately harsh, so that only those who desperately needed help would ask for it. Families were split up and housed in different parts of the workhouse. The poor were made to wear a uniform and the diet was monotonous. There were also strict rules and regulations to follow. Inmates, male and female, young and old were made to work hard, often doing unpleasant jobs such as picking oakum or breaking stones. Children could also find themselves hired out to work in factories or mines.

Shortly after the new Poor Law was introduced, a number of scandals hit the headlines. The most famous was Andover Workhouse, where it was reported that half-starved inmates were found eating the rotting flesh from bones. In response to these scandals the government introduced stricter rules for those who ran the workhouses and they also set up a system of regular inspections. However, inmates were still at the mercy of unscrupulous masters and matrons who treated the poor with contempt and abused the rules.

Although most people did not have to go to the workhouse, it was always threatening if a worker became unemployed, sick or old. Increasingly, workhouses contained only orphans, the old, the sick and the insane. Not surprisingly the new Poor Law was very unpopular. It seemed to punish people who were poor through no fault of their own."

 

 

Brazilnut
Brazilnut
28 Apr 2013 18:08

Could history be repeating itself?

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